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of energy conservation of any office building in the united states. >> we became involved in the san francisco public utilities headquarter project during the time when the project was at a stand still for a number of reasons, largely due to budget issues. and at the time we were asked to consider an alternative design using concrete rather than the scheme that was potentially planned for previous to that, which was a steel frame structure that used hydraulic dampers to control seismic motion. >> so, i met with my team. we worked hard. we came up with a great idea. let's take out the heavy steel structure, let's put in an innovative vertical post tension concrete structure, great idea. we did that. a lot of other things. and we came up with a price of 140 million. so, we achieved that goal. and, so, when we first started looking at the building, it was going to cost a lot of money. because of the way it was being built, we could only get 12 floors. we wanted more space for our employees. we ended up going and saying, okay, if we do a concrete building instead, which was web core's id
hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water system. we've budget working on power generation in the country. we've been doing sewer for the city. we're looking at a brand-new rebuild of all watt systems in san francisco and we haven't had a home that's been other than mental. >> they staff over 900 people. the puc is in two office locations. >> you know, this is such a great place for a building. if the puc owned that building and we could make that the icon i can sustainable building puc represents, wouldn't be a dramatic idea? >> so, one of the major decisions we made was we wanted to make a statement with this building. we wanted this building to be a lead
the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very successful in the brew pub business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that ch
look at many of you here today, knowing many of you have a key role in energy policy today, and hopefully what might happen over the next year or two as we consider the truly game changing opportunity we have here in the united states as it relates to energy. before i proceed and share remarks with you, i would like to introduce our friends at the head table today. i would like to begin with a new great cheerleader of energy that has come to the united states senate from the state of north dakota. senator, would you stand, please? [laughter] [applause] i think i finally found someone who is a bigger cheerleader than i am. we look forward to working with you. she is truly an expert in the area of oil and natural gas. she has been the tax commissioner and the state attorney general. she knows the industry well. let me quickly go around and introduce others. walter, if you would please stand. walt is the general president of the iron workers union. let me introduce doug. he is the president of the united brotherhood of carpenters heard we work closely. we have 15 unions now. t
i will say hard energy sources and fossil fuels and that sort of thing, and even in my own personal campaign there was a hit piece that came out about how i was in bed with shell oil and nigeria and active vifts there and we know that is true and disappearing and what not and i don't think we should under estimate the type of political quagmire that this program will find itself in and the attacks are unwarranted and misinforming and certainly i'm not suggesting they're all coming from pg&e, but certainly there is a motivation to maintain the monopoly they have held in the city around providing energy, so with that being said i just wanted to close my comments and i am glad next week i think we're at lafco hearing the task force recommendations. that is critical and sometimes we pass the policies and our actions never conform with the policies that we pass, so if we're serious about reaching that goal in 10 years i think we really need to get serious and that's why cleanpower sf is so important, but in closing i want to go back again and harp on my jimmy carter issue of earlier and
're going to reach these goals of 100% renewable energy in that time frame. >> right. >> and certainly that's why i had some concerns around making sure that the values of the cleanpower sf program are ones that are always emphasized because again this is a conversation that has been in this country really since -- for a long time, but certainly in the 70's it took on a greater level of discussion, but then the conversation sort of didn't go anywhere. i think it was jimmy carter was the person person to put solar energy panels on the roof, and then i mentioned a couple of times someone named emory lovins who wrote a book "soft energy path" and took on the issues of fossil fuels and coal and sustainable wind and solar and other sources and just 30 years later we're still -- >> still plugging away. >> still at the beginning of the conversation, so for years i guess san franciscans really haven't had an opt in -- certainly not an opt out choice, and so sometimes we talk too much about opt in i get a little nervous, so anyway i thed to thank you. >> you're welcome. >> before going to public co
by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not understood], build apps and explore what's possible. >> i'm chris, the co-founder and ceo of 100-plus and we use data from many different sources to try to help people be more healthy in their daily life. >> hi. [speaker not understood]. we're a mapping and location-based analytics platform. and we are working with open data and trying to see how we can turn data into information, data into knowledge, and the kind of decision products. >> hi, i'm john, ceo of motion loft. we're trying to understand how people move around cities and provide that data to the public to build new tools for public safety. >> hi, i'm [speaker not understood] with code for america. we're a peace core for geeks. we're trying to bring talent from the private second for and government to innovate. we work with dozens of citieses across the country and next year we should be working with san francisco whi
, not just around clean energy but employment and if we're successful in this program, and especially to the build out of the program that can happen when we have revenue coming in and many jobs can come with the build out and i am excited about that. there are neighbors in san francisco that are greatly impacted by unemployment, greatly impacted by marginalization and racism and inability to access the job market and this can lead the way that we have a strong implementation of programs and services to support communities that are in need of opportunity, so i'm very xietded about how we can move forward with this program, and i will actually cede the mic to the president of the commission. any opening remarks about today's -- >> i can't add more to that articulate overview and i support it and thank you to the commissioners that preceded me and the staff and the now general manager as well for their contributions during that process. thank you mr. chairman. >> thank you. today we will be discussing the customer notification and the education plan. i think it's the bulk of the wo
for the cost difference between providing a renewable energy credit versus firmed and shaped renewable power, so it's the product difference that is embedded in that price difference which goes to commissioner olague's statement that people need to understand the value behind what the price premium is addressing. >> and credit that pg&e can purchase rather than generate the clean power themselves . correct. >> correct. >> and we limit that component to 5% of the overall portfolio. >> thank you. commissioner moran any other? >> no. >> commissioner vietor. >> yes, i had a follow up with that. with the code of kukd and the script and how we talk about the cleanpower sf and the pg&e offering and i don't know if that is sort of -- you talked about that internally i imagine but i think that would be a very important part of the roll out plan and the outreach plan is when that pg&e offering does come online how it will be talked about to the tar communities and the other groups that we will bring in down the road and i wanted to highlight that. i think that's important piece of the outreach prog
was working in the world of energy and there i think we have taken enormous steps in the direction of a modern sustainable green economy, what we call now distributed generations of people producing and consuming energy. this is happening at an incredible pace in california and i know california like this is and we want to connect with california. some of the events will require the supports of the leaders that are here present, the leaders of the italian american associations. i am very proud to say that all of the leaders of the italian american associations are gathered today, mr. mayor, and senator assembly man and board of supervisors is here to celebrate with us and ramona blackwell who with the committee of the italians abroad and elected body and we will need your support and it's not just top down but bottom up. we're are open to your ideas and suggestions. we want it to a great celebration and people are in charge and in power and they will also run the show. that's our objective. by the way also have guests from outside california and salt lake city -- i don't know where he
the city would be borrowing money to do energy efficiency in those private properties and to install solar panels on [speaker not understood] the properties to install chp units, internal combustion chp units on top of, inside of, or next to about 300 buildings owned by private property owners in the city. so, it's not that it's a good or bad idea. it's just a very big different idea that would require a more risk and more money be borrowed by the city. >> there are two other assumptions i saw in there i wanted you to clarify if possible. one is didn't it also assume 100% enrollment over four years or something like that? >> it basically assumes about 2 66,000 to 267,000 account participants. and that's on an order magnitude of about 330,000 electric accounts. so, roughly all big commercial and all big residential consumers. and the other big assumption i want to make sure -- i know you'll appreciate is that the model assumes a socialization of cost and benefits. and, so, unlike anything else you've done with rate setting where the state requires us to set costs and rates by class, so, com
, the simplest thing to do is just in effect make gas more effective. but theseust become energy stream and one more thing about the carbon taxes, what they do is they often by grandfathering in current polluters, they are a giant giveaway to the friends of the current administration. melissa: is a great point nobody talks about. clearly we could spend all night on this, but i want to move on, maybe i'm looking at this all wrong. we should bite the bullet and early tax people and pay down the debt once and for all. if we just grit our teeth and raise taxes once and for all as tax everyone 40%, no exemptions, nothing, just 40%, we could wipe out the debt in three years. a good idea? >> not a chance. melissa: why? >> did you check your math? melissa: so maybe it takes four years, five years, why not tax everybody 40%? >> even if you raise taxes to 100%, you could not pay it off. the only question is how can we do it, will we do it honestly or through inflation? it is impossible to pay the debt off. when you look at the unfunded liabilities that dwarf the official debt, we cannot tax our way out o
a ping pong master while recording my debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. . >> reality stars like honey boo bo to hollywood legends like cher, we have all the celebritying writ scoop you may have missed over the weekend. >> a british star whose name is tom holland, and he will tell us about his new movie that's getting a lot of attention. >> that's motivation to finally lose those extra added pounds for the new year thanks to the newest members of joy's fit club who lost, what do i weigh, 110 pounds. >> what's going on. >> that's a lie. there's no way i'm missing that. then i heard about hotwire and i realized i could actually afford both trips. see, when really nice hotels have unsold rooms, they use hotwire to fill them. so i got my four-star hotels for half-price! >> men: ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e ♪ hotwire.com >> announcer: save big on car rentals too, from $12.95 a day. people have doubts about taking aspirin for pain. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a rec
for cliff stearns. on the energy and commerce committee, is that right? >> no, he is taking over the position that mary bono mack had and he will be the vice chair of the commerce committee. it will be interesting to see how and whether she tries to assert her authority. she has actually told me that she is interested in tackling something related to piracy. but i would agree that it's very unlikely. all members are extremely wary of trying to enact laws of technology that they perhaps have an expertise on. and that they don't understand all the ramifications. and i think with various lobbyists, nobody is interested in having a repeat of that. >> what about potential changes? >> guest: that is the big question. there was widespread speculation however, those plans have been placed on hold. no one knows what to think. his legacy is very uncertain at this place. it has passed that many of the it, the allies have either abandoned the commission in some fashion or arguing that they didn't go far enough in the rules that they implemented. i would not be surprised if the rules were sho
to shad dee alcarra. who's-who really has been a beakon of energy inside of our office at the mayor's office and neighborhood service and is sweating through our work to make sure we are well on point to have a great celebration here at city hall and so again shad dei thank you very much for your work. to all of you here tonight from the city family i want to saw thank you for joining us here as well and to really encourage you to take part of in all of the if he istivities that we have to offer here at city hall and for those of you who have an opportunity to tine sign in at the front please do so we can reach you through the mayor's office and neighborhood services center which highlights the many services and if he is activities that occur in san francisco and in our city. and so while we take a pause, for a moment, to bring some more art into our hall, we would like to pause for one more musical enter lewd and to begin with the rest of our program. so thank you all very much. ♪ ♪ (applause). . (applause). . . >> thank you guys so much for that beautiful performance can w
. an still is technology, a little bit in financial, materials and energy. >> tom: growth and optimism there from u.s. trust. it's chris hizy with us from new york. >> tom: in just a few weeks the debate over government spending cuts will heat up. the defense industry is one of those targeted, and today president obama nominated former rebublican senator chuck hagel as his next secretary of defense. hagel is a decorated vietnam veteran and former businessman. the president called him, "the leader our troops deserve." >> as a successful businessman he also knows that even as we make tough fiscal choices, we have to do so wisely, guided by our strategy, and keep our military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. >> tom: hagel's not a shoe-in for the position. he's received criticism for his record on israel, iran, and gay rights. current defense secretary leon panetta says he will retire when his replacement is approved by the senate. >> tom: tonight we begin a new weekly series here on nbr. we partnered with some of the nation's top universities to bring you the best re
're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented these new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the term of smart building. roughly 40% of the carbon emissions t
it wasn't, but it precipitated this energy that came from north africa, syria, for a flood of young people who came into iraq. >> sean: and we'll have the truth behind the general's rolling stone interview that ended his career in an abrupt fashion and finding bin laden and general stanley mcchrystal was in that operation and he says there were missed opportunities in pakistan. and the general goes behind the scene on the hunt for the world's most wanted terrorist and the change he brought to the counter insurgency fight. >> i'm coming here to listen to my commanders and afghan partners, this is all part after listening tour. one thing i'm talking to them about is discussing the way we conduct counter insurgency. the cultural shift is to go from what we were raised as in many cases toward conventional war and kinetic options to remembering we're really here to win the population and sometimes an indirect or a softer approach is operationally more effective than might be more traditional. i think we'll all continue to work toward it, i can't predict, but i believe we're doing the right thin
, when he gets a sense of misdirection for the activities, the energies, where he's going to put places, he probably ends up wasting a lot of opportunity and missing opportunities. but that's a course for him to work out. i'm retired from freedom works. they will have to work out their business on their own terms. >> what is the fight within freedomworks? what's the fight? tell us -- tell the outsider who is not a tea party person, no the a freedom works person, who is all this noise coming out of the tea party movement, especially fre dom works. what is the fight about? >> first of all, understand the tea party movement is so much larger than freedom works. freedom works has been a very important part. what i'm anxious for for freedom works to once again be that organization of activist volunteers working across the country with a clear set of ideas, principles, policy objectives, and focusing their energy on that so that we can have a contribution to the kind of results we had in the election year of 2010. i believe the organization has gone adrift from that. i'm excited for the possi
. friday, a five-year high. know we don't have a lot of energy, but i'm not that worried about it right now. see a bigger drop before people got concerned. upside, boeing having a lot of problems. airlines, all up today. the numbers have been great. fares up and revenue trends stable and fuel prices are stable. we've got a potential deal out there with u.s. air, and -- and amr out there, so the important thing is good news for the airlines in general. all the jewelry companies having a great day. cignet great sales, most jewelry stores to the upside. telecoms on the weak side. pcs had very weak subscriber figures though that was during the trading day yesterday. a little strange about the fact that they are all down today. finally, guys, you were talking about whether or not we'll have good numbers on the earnings front and whether the weak earnings are baked. in doing the same thing again, guys. brought the numbers down really, really low. 3% growth in the 500 so far this quarter. down from 12%, 13%. they are going to beat these numbers once again and so the bulls will argue that once agai
, it just -- the energy around this place, and we were lucky enough to feel it, this took place over the road from us, was extraordinary. >> three powerful pictures. one, first stood in silence and prayed. second, the 60,000 on the international plaza lifted a shout. you might have heard that in the building. >> heard it where i live. >> it shook heaven and earth. third, the great beam of light representing our hope to shine a light on slavery shot three miles in the sky. i knew it was coming. most people didn't. it took my breath away. it's that visual symbol, instagramable moment. you can't tell someone in four seconds what's going on with slavery in the world but you can show them that image of 60,000 little lights and one giant light, and that can begin the conversation of saying, we're waking up and we want to do something about it. >> yeah. i admire you and the energy and the work that you guys are doing. keep it up. good to see you. >> thank you. >> the found of the passion movement. an extraordinary gathering, too. if you're in atlanta around that time of year, check that out
are expected it show up if huge numbers at a hearing in san francisco to demand clean safe energy. groups urge the california public utilities commission to shut down the nuclear plant in southern california. two reactors have been shut down for a year now after leaks that sent radiation into the neighborhood. >> five people are recovering from injuries after an escalator packed with people suddenly kicked into reverse at a rail station in jersey city, new jersey, yesterday. the escalator was going up and it stopped and went backwards. people were piling up at the bottom of the escalators and others tried to jump over to escape the pile and authorities say the station was damaged during super storm sandy in october. >> an investigation is underway into why a tanker ship scraped the bay bridge. next, what we are lending about the shipping accident. a man guiding the tanker has been checked out before. >> a handful of traffic trouble spots is turning your morning here you go little man. [ humming ] [ babbling ] the cheerios bandit got you again? [ both laugh ] ♪ the one and only, cheerios ...a
in a relatively short time. the first contract with energy companies have been signed. while billions are being spent to bail out the banks, many indebted families feel they have been abandoned. >> seven months ago, we applied for social welfare relief. we have not had an answer yet. >> antonin solaris as a bit of money driving a taxi. he says the streets are becoming more and more empty. most people do not shop or go out anymore. he sees only occasional demonstrations against austerity measures. he says he wishes he could turn back the clock sometimes. >> i should not have taken out so many loans, and i should have been more careful with my money. i tell youngsters like my son to watch how they spend their money. they are going to have it tough. they have to learn that they cannot have everything they want. >> low taxes, cheap credit, and ill-thought and russian gains boosted the island's economy for a number of years. now tens of thousands of indebted separates are on the brink of ruin, like the ballerino of nicosia. >> the separate president has blamed expose banks for his country having to
and corn -- cultivates crops like wheat and corn. >> that is half of the total energy we produce. it is a shame to let it go up in the air. that is why we thought it would make more sense to use the heat sensibly. breeding african catfish was a very suitable option. >> the heat is now being used for eco-friendly agriculture in the form of farm machinery. they receive a subsidy per kilowatt hour from the government. the cooperative is still not breaking in much profit because -- raking in much profit because the business is cost intensive. sales have been rather sluggish. >> how much fish that we process this week? >> 150 kilos. >> we invite people to taste the fish. every two years, we organize a festival. more people are coming. that helps, but we face difficulties due to the wholesalers and supermarkets, which offer imported fish at very low prices. it is hard to compete with them. >> for example, these cost just one.60 -- 1.60 euros. no supermarket is willing to pay that much. >> 2013 is a thrilling year for wagner fans around the world who are celebrating the 200th anniversar
proof. it also includes measures to help businesses invest in facilities for renewable energy and expand overseas. it will also improve the health care system. the emergency economic measures are expected to total over $225 billion. there will be a shortfall of around $55 billion. the government has decided to make up the difference with government bonds for construction purposes. the government hopes to have the cabinet approve the supplementary budget bill in its meeting on friday. >>> the japanese finance minister says the government will buy bonds to be issued by europe's rescue fund. this is part of a plan to lead the yen lower and spur economic growth. the european stability mechanism or esm was established last october to support debt-strapped countries in the region. >> translator: japan in the future will consider esm bonds an important investment asset. along with other euro denominated bonds issued by major european nations. >> the government plans to use the foreign currency bonds to continue to buying esm bonds. government officials see the moreover as a way to stabilize th
since 1965. >> so much positive to do now and we will the time and the energy without the budget crisis overwhelming everything to focus on just that. >> i think we have to trust their word until proven. and i think it is clear, it is their show, and we will be right there. the republicans are. reminding them that they said they would work with everybody. >> republicans say they are waiting to see if democrats will restrain from spending. >>> apple reached a major milestone. users have downloaded 40 billion apps from the apple store. half of those were in 2012. a manager said developers made more than 7 billion dollars creating. apple stock followed the nasdaq today, slipping $3. that is a loss of half a percent. >>> nice day today. cold this morning, tomorrow morning, not quite as cold but it will get chilly. here is what i am tracking. gulf of alaska. it will come down like this and that brings cold air. tomorrow we get this pattern. into the next 36 hours that system drops in from the north. dense fog advisory in ports of the south bay and -- parts of the south bay, east bay, and the
much energy. >> hey, you are beautiful. and i love you. >> why? because... it is definitely a lot more fun than being inside. >> so far we have had zero problems. it is a long-step process, a lot of thinking and people involved. so we think that we got rid of all
a strong advocate for justice and pro live ravings nuclear energy and over the past 30 years she stood against injustice? san francisco by improving conditions in hotel and is affordable hogs for low increase people and from 2010 to 12, she set the bar for progressive land use policy in san francisco and this year christina has represented district five and served those neighborhood in our city with passion, commit and an open mind, prioritizing ever each resident department in her districts in order to make district five safe, clean and a abuse place to live and work i'm not going to read the rest of of it but christina thank you i have known you for yeast and i know that we will continue to work together for many years to come and i want to thank you for your open mind and i want to thank you for doing what you thought is right and i want to thank you also for speaking your mind and just again for all that you have done for this board and for your district and for our city and with that, thoi we have a lot of colleagues that want to think let start with supervisor campos. >> tha
on that today. i believe that the greatest use of or great use of police department energy is around people who are dealing with mental health issues and mental health crisis and the crisis intervention team is really geared to responding to that great need we have here in san francisco. i am concerned personally about the use of electronic controlled weapons, tasers, especially how they could be used in a show of force, not just bringing about compliance but in a show of force on people who are mentally ill in san francisco and i think that for me it makes a lot of sense that we make our work around crisis intervention as strong as it can be. before considering, you know, use of lethal force in the department. i am not a decision maker through but this is part of a hearing from hearing from the supervisors and members of the public. we also have here, i am happy to have chief greg sure and who is here to present on this issue. he only has a limited amount of time here this morning and so i would like to call him up first to discuss his objective or his interest, the work of the department arou
in the blue green alliance which was an alliance between environmentalists and labor and promote green energy and other activities and he brought all of this to the college board when he came. he brought me on, as i said to be a warrior, to fight the corruption, the lack of transparency, and other horrible things that were going on at the time, and after things got going we worked together on some projects of policy. he had an idea to create a sustainability plan that was not going anywhere for a while, but we worked together on that and we passed it, and it's really a great plan. it's an environmental model, i have to say. he brought a sunshine policy. we worked together in passing a sunshine policy. you have no idea how hard this was. everyone was opposed to it. it took a year, but we finally got it through, and he was persistent. we would meet about it and after i would say "i don't know milton. this doesn't look like it's going anywhere" and he would say "no. we're going to do this. we're going to do this" and he was right. he was a real reformer. he kept pushing and pushing
or tax credits for renewable energy. all that is important. we have to keep that going. that will get hard because we will face is demographics. that is my 74th birthday on april 7. i am aware of the and aging population which i have become and we are an aging population relative to what we were. luckily, we have millions of fresh arrivals that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were
and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton was a true believer sometimes to his detriment and would take on any power he needed to be even if it meant being fired from the board and "you're not doing enough. you're not raising enough money". he would take on anyone anytime if it was the right thing to do. he felt so strongly things needed to be resolved at city college and he never stop fighting after being diagnosed and surgery and he went to the meetings. he was a true believer and wanted to make it a better educational facility. many of his friends who are here and they would agree if you wanted someone in your corner you wanted milton. and there was a question that he had a temper and he did not and we had a bully in our neighborhood that was beating me up and milton made it clear physically that is not going to happen
to say, i intervened and i was young and what i did not know intellectually, i made up for in energy. i intervened on the basis that he was a child that had been subjected to incredible abuse. he was very much a kid and the child welfare system. it happens too many violent youth. i intervened, and he was never prosecuted. he was 14 years old, he was put into what would be thought of now has a psychiatric facility. it was a child psychiatric facility. he underwent all kinds of treatment, training, came out, went back to school. it really went through recovery. and then graduated high school, went to community college, and i would like someone to guess what profession he wound up going into. law enforcement. he was not with the lapd. he was with a smaller police department for 30 years. he has since retired. he has been married twice. he has raised four children. he has lived an extraordinary life. i am grateful for having had him in my life as a guidepost. i do think it is the ultimate irony that he turned out to be a police officer. >> we have some other questions. very good questions.
this space with everybody. all of the beautiful courage that it takes to be up here. a lot of energy to the healing circle as well. as a juvenile, i was in juvenile hall and i went through that whole system myself. i have worked with tattoo removal, i went to other development programs. through personal experience and being raised by a single mom and being proud of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and sayin
of the day's other headlines. five stories, one minute. first up china is betting on solar energy. the country's top economic planning official says china plans to more than double solar capacity this year and to 10 gigawatts solar power capacity. >>> amazon is planning to open a one million square foot fulfillment center in new jersey. the new facility expected to open early next year and it will create hundreds of jobs. we need them. >>> target is pledging to match prices of select online rivals, sorry around the nation's second largest discounter, will match deals customers find on identical products all the time. i think that was year-round. ashley: it was year-round. sandra: gotcha. samsung expects record high fourth quarter profits. the company sate operating profit would be $8. billion and beating estimates up 89% from a year earlier. >>> anheuser-busch is promoting a new buyer at super bowl for the second year in a row. the beer giant pushing budweiser black crown plan. expected to be on sale nationwide january 21st [buzzer] ashley: you made it. sandra: ashley will try it
, quirky and fun. >> talking about new things, new ways that you're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented the new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the
, that kind of energy, that's actually going to drag other people along. >> i remember his speech at the ronald reagan library, and the woman who asked him the question, he was very presidential in that speech. but there are times, and i think he would be the first to admit it, when, you know, saying what he thinks is much more important than being a statesman. let's just play some of them for all of you. >> the people who pretend to be serious commentators who have wrote about this are among the most ignorant people i have ever heard in my whole life. >> let me tell you something, i can go back and forth with you as much as you want. and let me tell you something, after you graduate from law school, you talk like that in the court room, your rear end is going to be thrown in jail. >> if what you want to do is put on a show and giggle every time i talk, i have no interest in answering your question. so if you would like to -- [ applause ] >> as we're giggling. >> and -- >> and? >> there's a big problem, which is chris christie's style is very appealing to people like me who grew u
: right. and everybody is saying he's going to be fine on that. >> the man has tremendous energy. i talked to some california labor leaders who are very tight with the governor and they said absolutely. >> jennifer: and on the republican side? >> hello, anybody out there? >> jennifer: crickets. >> [ cricket sound effect ] >> jennifer: all right. "san francisco chronicle" political reporter joe garofoli, appreciate it. up next a virginia legislator is putting forward a bill that would require at least one person in every school to have to carry a gun. we'll ♪ >> jennifer: back inside "the war room," i'm jennifer granholm. in the wake of the sandy hook elementary school shootings, you recall the nra suggested all schools install armed guards to prevent a similar tragedy. >> the only way to stop a monster from killing our kids is to be personally involved and invested in a plan of absolute protection. the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. >> jennifer: of course wayne lapierre went on to suggest that there should be armed personnel
to get up to paige from the panhandle it's like a 12% grade. to put that in terms of energy expended it's about four times the amount of effort to get up that 12% grade as it would be to go down oak street as you normally would. so people said it's out of the way, it's slower, it's taxing on what's already a lot of people do a long commute from the west down to downtown. so it just was not a desirable route for people who ride a bike. some people choose to go that way. some people prefer to ride in mixed traffic on those streets, you know, streets and stop signs but more people would prefer to ride in a separate facility on oak and fell and that they would prefer traffic signals as opposed to the stop signs and on the flattest route. >> supervisor olague: how does this relate to the bike plan. is there any reference to some of these projects? >> actually the planning department could probably speak better to that. >> to answers your question, supervisor olague, the oak street introduction of a new bike lane on oak street was included as a long-term improvement project in the bike lane,
fund. we are looking for businesses that are looking to put in more energy-efficient equipment or retrofit or remove toxins from processed here we have been lending to drive cleaners that are giving you more environmentally friendly products, truck drivers putting in new exhaust systems. finally, just to give you kind of a scale of what we do, mark mentioned the sba right guaranteed 275 loans in a year. we expected to 50 or 60 in san francisco this year, and more like 250 or 300 throughout the bay area. if you are hearing something interesting and you want to talk, the dominant in the purple suit has been handing me question cards out. >> i am the ne community federal community union. we are like a bank except we are nonprofit. we are 501 c 14. we are insured up to 250,000. we build credit. what we do a lot
clean renewable energy to meet their state mandates and as well as spending that had been previously approved by the cpuc for operating maintaining and upgrading their electric generation and distribution systems. so, those were the drivers behind the rate increase that san franciscans are feeling on the electric side. pg&e also stated that they foresee customers, electric customers likely facing another rate increase this may of about 2% to pay for electric transmission infrastructure improvements. so, the take away on that is for our clean power sf program at least is the premium that we projected clean power sf customers would pay is getting smaller. any questions on that item before i move to the second? >> the main one is a transmission increase? >> that's what they said in their press release, yes. >> that would not change the differential. >> that won't change the differential for clean power sf because we're only offering a generation service component, yes. but i think it's generally interesting for customers in san francisco so i mentioned it. >> so, how much less will the
thank you for your interest in criminal justice and all your energies and efforts on its behalf. we know this is an issue that is of great importance to the state of california and to the nation. of course we have the opportunity to yet again lead the way here in california. we're offering a bill this year, s.b.-1506 which would redefine the crime of simple possession of a drug from felony to misdemeanor. there are 13 other states, and the federal government which already do this and in the 13 other states, we have the data that shows that we get better results, better outcomes, meaning safer communities, and surprisingly the states include not only the large eastern states of pennsylvania and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and the
be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things
acquisition, very good. there's so many notes out today, that energy is going down in price. that's always been the variable that no one can control. i think we've all flown planes and would be shocked that, hey, this is an extremely full flight, will you please put your luggage where you can't find it. i do believe southwest, after what i thought was paying too much for air tran, was able to rationalize this. i like the deutsche bank upgrade. >> then it came out. >> thank you. you know, yesterday's phil lebeau report, you watch the stock shrink as you see the smoke coming. boeing is one of the best-run companies in the world, would i fly this thing. but the technology of a new plane obviously challenged. >> interesting. >> we've had gordon bethune, he calls it a teething problem. which i guess happens with every new model. just rarely on such a public scale, right? this is an operation now. >> you need some gripe water. >> it still works. >> i don't know if you ever used that. that's a way to be able to -- when the kids don't feel well, teething problem. but i will point out, it may be a
about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. campbell's. i've got two tickets to paradise!l set? pack your bags, we'll leave tonight. uhh, it's next month, actually... eddie continues singing: to tickets to... paradiiiiiise! no four. remember? whoooa whooaa whooo! you know ronny, folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. and how happy are they jimmy? happier than eddie money running a travel agency. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> bret: life groups calling for end to federal funding of planned parenthood after the group reported record-breaking numbers for last year. correspondent shannon bream on the facts and figures. >> at the same time, it announced performing a record high number of abortions, planned parenthood revealed it received more than a half billion dollars in taxpayer money during the last fiscal year. prompt progress-life advocates to sound the alarm. >> the average person thinks we sh
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